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How many calories should I eat?

by Akhil Pandey
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So summer is about to say hii to all of us for some people it’s time to cut or just want to lose some weight but you don’t know how many calories you need to consume or what exercises you need to do! no worries anymore this is the perfect article if want to know how you can lose weight so let’s jump into our today’s sub-topics:

  • What is basale metabolic rate (BMR)?
  • How to calculate your BMR?
  • What is total daily energy expenditure (TDEE)?
  • How I can use BMR & TDEE for weight loss?

WHAT IS BASALE METABOLIC RATE [BMR]?

Knowing your basal metabolic rate (BMR) helps you determine the estimated baseline amount of calories your body needs to function and serves as a starting point to determine how many calories you may want to consume based on your goals.

Generally speaking, your BMR—which is sometimes referred to as resting metabolic rate—is the total number of calories your body needs to perform essential, life-sustaining functions. These basal functions include circulation, breathing, cell production, nutrient processing, protein synthesis, and ion transport. Using a mathematical formula, you can determine your BMR. Below, learn more about the basal metabolic rate and how it applies to you.

The basal metabolic rate measures the calories needed to perform your body’s most basic (basal) functions, like breathing, circulation, and cell production. BMR is most accurately measured in a lab setting under very restrictive conditions.

How to Calculate Your BMR?

If you are looking to reach or maintain a particular weight, you may find it helpful to have a BMR calculation. You can find the number using a formula designed by scientists, get it tested in a lab, or use an online calculator. No method is perfectly accurate, but a lab test will probably give you the best estimate.

Because lab tests can be costly, many people use one of the other two methods to determine the basal metabolic rate and/or the total number of calories they burn each day.

The equation to Calculate Your BMR

The Harris-Benedict Equation is often used to estimate basal metabolic rate.

  • Men: BMR = 88.362 + (13.397 x weight in kg) + (4.799 x height in cm) – (5.677 x age in years)
  • Women: BMR = 447.593 + (9.247 x weight in kg) + (3.098 x height in cm) – (4.330 x age in years)

Or you can use this calculator.

What is total daily energy expenditure (TDEE)?

Total daily energy expenditure (TDEE) refers to the total amount of energy that a person burns or expends in a day through various activities, such as resting metabolic rate (RMR), physical activity, and digestion.

RMR, which represents the energy required to maintain basic bodily functions, such as breathing, heartbeat, and cellular processes, is typically the largest component of TDEE, accounting for up to 70% of total energy expenditure in sedentary individuals.

Physical activity, including exercise and non-exercise activities such as walking, fidgeting, and household work, is the second-largest component of TDEE, accounting for up to 30% of total energy expenditure.

Finally, the thermic effect of food, which is the energy required to digest, absorb, and metabolize the food we eat, represents a small portion of TDEE, typically around 10% of total energy expenditure.

To determine TDEE, one can use various methods, such as indirect calorimetry, which measures oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide production to estimate RMR and physical activity, or equations that take into account factors such as age, gender, height, weight, and activity level. Knowing one’s TDEE can be helpful in determining the appropriate calorie intake for weight maintenance, loss, or gain.

So basically TDEE is an estimate of how many total calories you burn in a day.

Since your BMR includes the calories you need while resting, we’ll also need to factor in movement and exercise.

To do this, we’ll take your BMR and multiply it by an “Activity Factor.”

ACTIVITY LEVELS CAN BE THOUGHT OF AS THE FOLLOWING:

Sedentary (BMR x 1.2): Sitting for long periods of time at work or home, such as working at a desk job, watching television, or playing video games for extended periods.

Lightly Active (BMR x 1.375): Engaging in light exercise or recreational activities for 30-60 minutes a day, such as leisurely cycling, swimming, or yoga.

Moderately Active (BMR x 1.55): If we called the gym on a weeknight looking for you, they’d find you. This averages out to about one hour and 45 minutes of walking (for exercise, not going around your house) a day, or 50 minutes of vigorous exercise a day.

Very Active (BMR x 1.725): Engaging in high-intensity exercise or sports for an hour or more per day, such as running, cycling, or swimming at a competitive level.

If you’re following along at home, you may notice that different Activity Factors can make a big difference in the calories burned.

So now you know what’s your BMR AND TDEE. Now, let’s move to the next point of the article which is…

How I can use my BMR & TDEE for weight loss?

Once you know your BMR and TDEE, all you need to do is make sure your caloric intake is less than that number!

So if your TDEE ends up being 2,200 calories per day, you need to eat fewer calories to achieve “weight loss”.

How fast you lose depends on how much your deficit is every day.

Generally speaking, there are about 3,500 calories in a pound.

In seeking weight loss, most dieticians recommend eating a deficit of anywhere between 500-1,000 calories a day.

The goal is not to lose weight the fastest — it’s to be consistent.

When you need motivation over long periods of time (like a weight loss journey), the tortoise approach generally trumps the hare mindset.

So looking at a TDEE of 2,200, if you aimed for 1,700 calories per day, you’d be eating at a 500-calorie deficit. At this rate, you’d lose approximately 1 pound per week.

To test the accuracy of your TDEE, follow this deficit and see if your weight drops by about a pound per week. If not, you may be over or underestimating your BMR or TDEE multiplier.

 So it’s pretty simple if your goal is to lose weight then consume fewer calories than your intake! For example, if your total caloric intake is 3500 then reduce your caloric intake by 10% to 15% (350-525 calories) so you don’t have any bad effects on your BMR.

CONCLUSION.

In summary, knowing your basal metabolic rate (BMR) and total daily energy expenditure (TDEE) can help you determine the estimated baseline amount of calories your body needs to function and serve as a starting point to determine how many calories you may want to consume based on your weight goals. BMR measures the calories needed to perform your body’s most basic functions, and TDEE refers to the total amount of energy that a person burns or expends in a day through various activities. To use BMR and TDEE for weight loss, you need to make sure that your caloric intake is less than your TDEE.

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